GACE MATH PRACTICE TEST PDF

I wanted to do something about it. Because its goal is to test your classroom readiness across the spectrum of content, our GACE Mathematics study guide covers a lot of ground. Because its goal is to test your classroom readiness across the spectrum of content, it covers a lot of ground. The purpose of the test is to ensure that candidates have sufficient knowledge in all relevant subject areas. This breadth can make it hard to know how to prepare.

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Expository Text Structures The following list gives an overview of some common expository informational text structures. Understanding the structure of a text gives students the ability to understand how information in the text relates. Here are a few examples of expository text structures: Description: In this type of text, the author describes a topic in detail. One example of a descriptive text is an encyclopedia article about tree frogs. Sequence of Events: The author uses a chronological order to show the sequence in which events happen or should occur.

An example of this type of text is a passage describing how to make a peanut butter and jelly sandwich. List: The author uses numerical or chronological order to list items or ideas.

For example, most recipes begin with a list of ingredients. A comparison shows how two ideas are alike. A web page explaining the differences between cheetahs and leopards is an example of this type of text. Cause and Effect: The author introduces one or more causes and then describes the effects of the cause s. Students should be able to differentiate between causes and effects.

A news article about how a hurricane caused a flood is an example of this type of writing. Problem and Solution: The author describes a problem or asks a question and then gives possible answers or solutions. An example of this type of writing is a chapter in a health book that tells children how to deal with sunburns. Context Clues Context clues are hints that an author inserts into a text to help readers determine the meaning of a word or phrase.

Students should be taught to use context clues when they encounter a difficult word. When a difficult word is encountered, a reader should consider what the information surrounding that word is saying.

Here are a few examples of how to use context clues to find the meaning of unknown words: Definition clues: The author gives the meaning of a term outright. Synonym clues: The author includes a synonym to help the reader understand the meaning of a word. She tore into the birthday presents and ruined the rug. I cannot believe what a bad dog she is. Students should be able to identify each of these elements and explain how they impact one another. Setting: When and where does the story occur?

In this case, the story occurs in a few different locations: a house made of straw, a house made of sticks, and a house made of bricks. The characters in the story are the three pigs and the Big Bad Wolf. Conflict:What is the main problem in the story? The Big Bad Wolf harrasses the pigs by trying to enter their homes without their consent. Eventually, the pigs enter a brick home.

Though gifted with amazing lung capacity, the wolf is unable to blow down this new house which shelters the pigs. No pork chops for the bad guy! Reading Foundational Skills This objective tests your ability to understand key ideas relevant to the foundations of literacy, reading development, and early orthographic development. You will be tested on your knowledge of phonological awareness, phonics, and word-recognition skills.

The test will also assess your understanding of the role of fluency in supporting comprehension. Take a look at these concepts. The ability to automatically process strings of letters as words develops over time as readers gain experience with words.

Sometimes, one letter is used to represent an entire word. The student generally lacks knowledge of the alphabet and lacks left-to-right directionality in writing. At this stage of development, writing only conveys meaning for the student who wrote it. During this stage, students are learning to become phonemic spellers. For example, they may use single letters to represent sounds, words, and syllables e.

At this stage of development, they begin using long vowel markers in their spelling e. During this stage, students begin reading with greater speed and can read silently. They can also begin to write extended texts. Phonological Awareness Phonological awareness is the ability to recognize and work with spoken language. Keep in mind that phonological awareness refers to what students hear, not what they read. Long before children learn to read, they learn the meaning of spoken words.

This important auditory skill is actually the very beginning of learning to read! There are a lot of activities that you can use to teach phonological awareness. Here are a few examples: Teaching nursery rhymes Reading stories with rhyming words aloud to students Helping students count out the syllables in a word Asking students to identify alliterative phrases Asking students what new word is made when a new phoneme unit of sound is put in front of an existing word Fluency In order to be fluent in the English language, students must first develop automaticity.

Automaticity is the ability to automatically recognize words, instead of sounding them out. Fluency varies over time and depends upon the text. Even a proficient reader may read unfamiliar words slowly.

Once students reach fluency, they move beyond labored decoding and are able to think more deeply about the meaning of the text. It is after achieving fluency that students really begin to enjoy reading. At this point, reading is automatic and no longer a complicated chore. There are multiple ways to boost and monitor fluency. You will demonstrate that you know how to help students write clearly and coherently.

Take a look at some concepts that may appear on the test. The Writing Process No matter what type of writing you are teaching whether formal or informal , there are usually basic steps that are followed. With formal writing assignments, these steps are called the writing process. During this phase, students often use diagrams for mapping out their thoughts. Drafting: Students create a rough draft by writing down their ideas in an organized way to convey ideas or to present arguments.

Revising: Students will review and modify their drafts during this phase. It is important that students receive feedback from a teacher or peer before revising their drafts. Editing: At this point in the writing process, students will proofread and correct errors in grammar.

Publishing: During this phase, the final drafts are shared with others. Sharing can be implemented in a variety of ways. For example, students can use computers to share their work online with classmates.

Authors, including student writers, use persuasive writing to change the minds of readers about a topic. Fortunately, digital tools can help students improve their language literacy. Microsoft Word, Google Docs, and many other platforms include built-in spell-check tools. A variety of online thesauruses and dictionaries can allow students to use precise language in their writing. Many online resources can provide students with examples of formal writing upon which to base their own informational or narrative texts.

A few helpful sites for this purpose include TweenTribune. Speaking, Listening, and Presenting This objective tests your knowledge of how to facilitate student listening and participation in verbal communication about grade-appropriate topics.

It will also test your knowledge of ways to help students develop skills necessary for speaking, listening, and presenting appropriately to an audience, including peers. Here are some concepts that are likely to pop up on the test.

Active listening is the act of giving full attention to the speaker in order to understand the complete message being relayed. An active listener may show verbal or nonverbal signs of listening.

Making related comments and asking related questions are verbal signs of active listening. Non-verbal signs of active listening include nodding, facing the speaker, and avoiding distractions, such as side conversations. Ask questions to achieve clarification.

Repeat information given by the speaker. Implement some of the following activities: Read stories to your students. Ask them to make predictions. Allow your students to engage in group conversations. This gives your students an opportunity to practice both speaking skills and listening skills. Play the telephone game. Have one student whisper a sentence to the next student. Each student repeats the sentence to the next.

Ask the final student to say the sentence aloud to see how much the sentence has changed during the game. Create a list of questions with your students to ask one another in small groups.

After each student in the group has answered, see how many answers the others can remember. Read students a short story or an article. Then read it again, changing some details. Each time your students hear a change, they can clap or raise their hand. As an elementary educator, you will teach students to use these skills when writing, reading, speaking, and listening.

Homophones Homophones are words that sound the same, but have different meanings and different spellings.

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Preparation Materials

Expository Text Structures The following list gives an overview of some common expository informational text structures. Understanding the structure of a text gives students the ability to understand how information in the text relates. Here are a few examples of expository text structures: Description: In this type of text, the author describes a topic in detail. One example of a descriptive text is an encyclopedia article about tree frogs. Sequence of Events: The author uses a chronological order to show the sequence in which events happen or should occur.

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How To Use GACE Practice Tests To Get A Passing Score

Every lesson includes videos, guided practice, self-tests, and more. Background lessons If you are struggling on a particular topic, we offer relevant background lessons to rebuild your math foundation! Grade reporting and progress tracking We offer detailed grade reporting and progress tracking to keep on task while completing your GACE Paraprofessional Math prep course! Thank you!!!

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GACE Mathematics (522): Practice & Study Guide

As a teacher, you are also a learner, and you definitely want to provide yourself with the best GACE study guide to make practicing for the exam efficient and effective. Unfortunately, the test prep industry has not taken the same care and attention to detail that you will in your future classrooms. Their interests lie in pumping out a high volume of material and writing misleading product descriptions that promise their practice tests will help you pass the test on the first try. To make matters worse, there are practice tests out there that publish incorrect questions and answers on the GACE tests. Finally, these expensive practice tests are often riddled with spelling mistakes, typos, and read as if the publishers skipped the editing stage. Your time and money is too valuable to be wasted on useless GACE practice tests and questions that do not match the actual test. In this article, we discuss three of the biggest complaints from actual users of GACE practice tests and give you practical tips for how to navigate them so you can use GACE practice tests effectively.

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