FORDLANDIA BOOK PDF

The book had got as far as Ford deciding to build a city - Fordlandia - in the Amazon and kick out Indians who were in the way, employ others who looked docile and might learn, and import other workforce as needed. He wanted to cut out the middleman for rubber and have the cheapest manufacturing possible. He also wanted to utterly control the lives of all his workers. He paid well.

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Share via Email Derelict rubber factories in Fordlandia. Local papers began raving about their future neighbour. Speculation ran wild: some columnists opined that Ford would be building a new railroad to the coast, or a new factory for his cars. Above all, they just wanted to know when he would be arriving. A city that would fuse the same concepts that Ford had championed throughout his career, and bring a better future to a forgotten part of the planet.

And that city would bear his name: Fordlandia. Fordlandia locator map It is difficult to overstate the reputation Henry Ford had built for himself by that time — whether in Brazil, America, or anywhere else on the planet.

Within a decade of its founding in Dearborn, Michigan in , the Ford Motor Company had revolutionised car production by introducing the assembly line — isolating tasks within the complex process of car assembly, allowing new models of his flagship vehicle, the Model T, to be cranked out faster than ever before, making the company a global success.

Ford believed fair treatment would make his workers more responsible citizens and, in the process, solidify a client base for manufacturers. He became increasingly convinced that his role in advancing society had to go beyond the factory floor, and encompass entire cities.

While he succeeded in bringing some of his smaller urban planning concepts to life, his much larger project, a massive manufacturing city to be built in northern Alabama — 75 miles long, with power supplied by damming the Tennessee river — never got off the ground.

Eventually, Ford settled on a location for his ideal city that was a good deal further south than Alabama: the Amazon. At the end of the previous century, the region had benefited from a monopoly on global rubber production, skyrocketing demands, and easy transportation via the navigable waters of the Amazon river.

Cities along the river had swelled with new residents seeking their fortunes, and had lined their streets with opulent new buildings. Belem, at the mouth of the river, became the busiest port in Brazil; upriver, Manaus became world famous for its decadent Amazon Theatre.

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Fordlandia: A Novel

Share via Email Derelict rubber factories in Fordlandia. Local papers began raving about their future neighbour. Speculation ran wild: some columnists opined that Ford would be building a new railroad to the coast, or a new factory for his cars. Above all, they just wanted to know when he would be arriving. A city that would fuse the same concepts that Ford had championed throughout his career, and bring a better future to a forgotten part of the planet.

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Fordlândia

In the s, the Ford Motor Company sought to elude British monopoly over the supply of rubber, mainly used for producing tires and other car parts. Central America was considered; however, information about the rubber trees in the Amazon was uncovered[ who? Negotiations with the Brazilian government started[ when? An agreement was signed and the American industrialist received an area of about 2. It was immediately hindered by poor logistics and diseases that affected the workers who succumbed to yellow fever and malaria.

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Fordlandia: The Rise and Fall of Henry Ford's Forgotten Jungle City by Greg Grandin

Back to when the word "banker" did not bring on waves of nausea. It is the early s and Henry Ford has worked out that it takes 7, operations to build a car, a third of them sufficiently simple to be done by "a one-legged man". Ford is about to heave us into an era of alienated labour, dead-end robotic boredom and, perhaps more significantly in our current climate, arrogant, unfettered business power. Not that he knows it; he thinks we are headed somewhere very different indeed. His workers would bash metal, but also nurture vegetables in small-town communities, not big cities. Their high wages would buy them cars — the same ones that they made — and the time to dig their gardens.

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