BRUNNSTROM STAGES OF STROKE RECOVERY PDF

Stages of Stroke Recovery Strokes affect , people annually resulting in , annual deaths. In addition, , are first time stroke victims and , are recurrent. Ages and gender can vary, but statistics show that more women are affected than men. Both of these strokes can affect the victim in several ways, including loss of speech and memory, muscle movement, paralysis, among other symptoms—each kind requiring a different type of rehabilitation.

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Stages of Stroke Recovery Strokes affect , people annually resulting in , annual deaths. In addition, , are first time stroke victims and , are recurrent. Ages and gender can vary, but statistics show that more women are affected than men. Both of these strokes can affect the victim in several ways, including loss of speech and memory, muscle movement, paralysis, among other symptoms—each kind requiring a different type of rehabilitation.

Where one may be wheel chair bound for a short period of time, others may need more permanent solutions to functioning on a daily basis. Among the various types of rehabilitation, a popular type of approach to recovery and treatment, is the Brunnstrom Approach—this approach breaks down the recovery stages post stroke, giving a pretty clear overview as to what a patient and caregiver can expect.

Because muscles become weak after a stroke, it is quite difficult, if not impossible, for a patient to engage their muscles—the Brunnstrom Approach, on the other hand, teaches patients how to use the abnormal synergy patterns to their advantage. There is no voluntary muscle movement due to the nerve damage in the brain and without early intervention, the muscles can completely atrophy, leaving the patient potentially paralyzed for the long-term.

STAGE 2 Some Spasticity—As the muscles begin to regain some basic movements, there may be an appearance of some spastic, abnormal movements. It is particularly important for the limbs to receive stimulation to avoid long term paralysis and muscle atrophy.

STAGE 3 Marked Spasticity Improvement—During this stage of recovery, there is an increase in muscle stiffness which may interfere with speech and thinking, as well as muscle movement; sometimes pain is also associated with this stage. The appearance of synergy patterns and coordination between muscles facilitate the voluntary movements which become stronger with occupational and physical therapy. This is the time to work on range of motion, stretching and building leg and arm strength by using exercise equipment and various non-weight bearing strengthening exercises.

It should be noted that BOTH sides should be worked on equally in order to evenly regain strength. Combing ones hair, purposeful use o f eating utensils , walking , driving a car, writing and swimming, are all attainable with repetition and practice at this stage.

The spasticity completely disappears, the patient is now able to engage in complex movements, and motor control is almost fully restored. STAGE 7 Return of Normal Function—This is obviously the ultimate goal for the patient; full mobility, muscle control, joint movement, and full use of arms, legs and hands have returned to normal, allowing the individual to go back to their customary daily life and all the activities that go along with it.

There are several successful approaches to stroke recovery. It is recommended to conduct your own research to find out what approach suits you or your loved ones needs best.

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Stages of Stroke Recovery

Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License 4. Abstract The Brunnstrom recovery stages the BRS consists of 2 items assessing the poststroke motor function of the upper extremities and 1 assessing the lower extremities. The 3 items together represent overall motor function. Although the BRS efficiently assesses poststroke motor functions, a lack of rigorous examination of the psychometric properties restricts its utility.

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The Brunnstrom Stages of Stroke Recovery

The Brunnstrom stages also called the Brunnstrom Approach are used by many physical therapists to assess how well their patients are recovering. The seven Brunnstrom stages were developed in the s by Swedish physical therapist Signe Brunnstrom as a framework to understand how muscle control can be restored after stroke. What makes the Brunnstrom approach so unique is how it views spasticity and involuntary muscle movement. Instead of seeing these as symptoms to fight, the Brunnstrom approach views them as part of the recovery process and utilizes them to aid recovery! Stage 1: Flaccidity The first stage of the Brunnstrom approach is the period immediately after a stroke when the connection between the muscles and brain are so damaged that flaccid paralysis flaccidity sets in.

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